Immersive Experiences

When I hear the phrase “immersive experiences” I typically think about the concept of augmented reality. Upon further investigation, I realize that “immersive experiences” expand beyond real life interactions with consumers, but it can apply to how brands can connect to consumers online through a website. These consumers are engaged in a highly visual web environments where they can easily get lost by all the interactive features. 

For instance, the Google Cultural Institute engages its visitors through a series of pictographs, informational blurbs, and other short and easy to consume material. Not only does this website help Google boost its brand image as a cultural provider, it gives consumers a place to relax and delve into history in the comforts of their own homes. 

Another great brand “immersive experience” would be from Burberry’s bespoke tab on its website. Consumers have the opportunity to customize their own iconic Burberry jacket. This option gives shoppers a chance to make their own unique products. Car websites are known to have this kind of immersive experiences for its consumers, but it is more interesting to see how it works in the fashion industry. 

As technology increasingly advances, so does marketing techniques. In this case, marketers have effectively invented novel ways to engage their audiences through augmented realities and immersive experiences. 

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E-commerce in online magazines

There has been a recent trend for magazines to integrate e-commerce in a more seamless manner for their readers. With new e-commerce capabilities, browsers have the ability to shop for products without leaving the original site. This convenience of having an on-site shopping cart would increase sales. In addition, it could potentially influence customers to try out new products that they wouldn’t normally opt for. 

Some magazines like Allure provides a similar experience, but only offers products from one retailer. Other magazines like Vogue or Elle use links to retailer sites and earn a portion for every sale. While this option is certainly more convenient for publishers, it isn’t at all for the customers. This is where 72Lux comes in. 

72Lux is a NYC-based startup that helps publishers transform their websites into successful online retail outlets. Currently, 72Lux has patent-pending technology like universal checkout, product catalog, brand management, data sharing, flexible customization, and multi-platform commerce solutions. 72Lux is now working with Essence and Teen Vogue to use a seamless check-out integration. Unlike other competing magazines, Essence and Teen Vogue will allow for their browsers to shop directly on-site rather than being directed to other retail sites. 

Hopefully more magazines will start utilizing this method of e-commerce, because it would definitely make online shopping a lot easier.